Dynamite: Who is the real Mary Anning?

Helen Dunmore Oct 18, 2020
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Dynamite: Who is the real Mary Anning?
Dynamite: Who is the real Mary Anning?

The story of the self-taught paleontologist Mary Anning has been changed to the big screen and renamed Ammonite, depicting love affairs in the 19th century.

Francis Lee of the film starring Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan confessed that this is not a biographical film, and although the romantic tendency of tranquility no longer exists.

Dynamite
Dynamite

He Still insist on depicting same-sex love stories.

The knowledge of Tranquility-which helped shape our understanding of prehistoric life-clearly explains why her story inspired “Amon”, which premiered in the UK on Saturday.

“In 19th-century England, Mary Anning was the three things you didn’t want to have-she was a woman, a working class, and a poor person,” Anja Pearson, who is struggling to commemorate her statue said.

Although her social status and gender meant that she never received the honor she deserved, she often risked her life in the search for fossils.

This discovery attracted the attention of the scientific elite.

In 1811, when Mary was only 12 years old, she discovered a 5.2m (17-foot) skeleton, now called an ichthyosaur. Twelve years later, she discovered the first complete skeleton of a plesiosaur, a marine reptile, so strange that scientists thought it was fake.

She also found the remains of Britain’s earliest pterosaur, believed to be the largest flying animal ever.

When she was a child, she would help her father collect fossils sold in a seaside cupboard store, but in 1810, when An Ning was 11 years old, he died of tuberculosis. After An Ning died, in order to help her mother make ends meet, An Ning continued to collect the fossils she sold to tourists and collectors.

Emma Bernard, curator of fossil fishes at the Natural History Museum, said:

“Mary Anning has very little formal education.”

A year after her father’s death, Anning discovered the bones-now called ichthyosaurs-and helped her enter the history books.

At the time, the concept of extinction was a relatively new concept to science, and this otherworldly creature has been a topic of debate for many years.

Paddy Howe, a geologist at the Lyme Regis Museum, is a technical adviser to the Asian Am people. He describes Anning as “a very poor child who is making wonderful scientific discoveries.”

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