Hurricane Ida is expected to hit Louisiana on Sunday as a Category 4 storm

Hurricane Ida is expected to hit Louisiana on Sunday as a Category 4 storm

Ada is relied upon to make landfall in Louisiana as a Category 4 storm around the same time that Hurricane Katrina hit 16 years prior. According to meteorological officials, Hurricane Ida is expected to land on the coastal areas of Louisiana with a life-threatening Category 4 storm on Sunday night, posing a major threat to the New Orleans metropolitan area.

According to data from the National Hurricane Center, Ada’s maximum sustained wind speed when passing through western Cuba on Friday night was 80 miles per hour, with even higher gusts.

Hurricane Ida is expected to hit Louisiana on Sunday as a Category 4 storm

The storm will enter the Gulf of Mexico on Saturday.

“What I can tell you is that Hurricane Ida is rapidly intensifying and the situation seems to be changing,” Governor John Bell Edwards said at a press conference on Friday night.

“The next 24 hours are very, very important. Now is the time to complete the preparations,” Bell Edwards said. “By tomorrow night, when night falls, you need to reach the place where you plan to ride the storm, and when the storm approaches you, you need to maintain the posture you want.”

Forecasters from the National Weather Service stated that wind gusts could reach 170 miles per hour.

According to data from the National Hurricane Center, the coasts of Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi are under storm surge warning, and the coast of Louisiana is now under a hurricane warning.

New Orleans may be hit particularly hard. The city’s mayor, LaToya Cantrell, ordered the forced evacuation of residents in low-lying areas outside the city’s dike system on Friday. She also called for voluntary evacuation within the dike system.

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Late Saturday Afternoon, Tropical storm conditions :

Tropical storm conditions are expected to arrive in the area, and officials said people who need to evacuate should evacuate immediately.

After passing through Youth Island and western Cuba, the storm is expected to travel to the southeastern and central parts of the Gulf of Mexico and then hit the Gulf Coast.

On Friday, hurricane warnings came into effect in the Isle of Youth and Cuba’s Binar del Río and Artemiza provinces.

Rainfall from southeastern Louisiana to the coast of Mississippi and Alabama may reach as much as 16 inches, and some areas may receive as much as 20 inches by Monday morning.

From Morgan City in Louisiana to Ocean Springs in Mississippi, the water level may rise to 11 feet. The National Weather Service said: “The most profound water will show up close to the arrival site and close to the coast toward the east, where the flood will be joined by tremendous and hazardous waves.”

It should be 7 to 11 feet east of New Orleans on Lake Bogne. The city’s floodwalls will be tested for surges, and its pumps will be responsible for drainage.

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Hey, I'm Helen Dunmore an article writer from London Ontario, Canada. I had done a master's in mass communication and M.Phill in political science and attended many College Journalism Broadcast programs where I wrote and won. I previously had attended Humber College for media studies which included writing for television and news. I have written several publications for many news related websites. Have experience more than 7 years, yeah quite a lot for you. I love writing, an expert in article writing. Currently doing article writing for many blog posts and work as an author for many web sites. Reading is my hobby, love books more than anything in my life.

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