The missing Hong Kong demonstrator Huang Cuishan “held in mainland China”

The missing Hong Kong demonstrator Huang Cuishan “held in mainland China”

A famous Hong Kong protester made her first appearance in 14 months and told the media that she was being held in mainland China.

The missing Hong Kong demonstrator Huang Cuishan "held in mainland China"
The missing Hong Kong demonstrator Huang Cuishan “held in mainland China”

Alexandra Wong, 64, is nicknamed “Grandma Yellow” and is often shown as waving the Union Jack during protests.

She said she was detained in the border city of Shenzhen in August last year and was forced to give up her radicalism in writing.

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Ms. Huang said that she was also sent on a “patriotic trip” in Shaanxi Province.

The history behind Hong Kong’s identity crisis and protests – first broadcast November 2019 Video Credit bbc

Last year’s anti-government protests began in June 2019 and involved plans to allow extradition to mainland China, but later evolved into a broader movement calling for full democracy.

Hong Kong was a British colony until 1997, but it was later returned to China in accordance with the “one country, two systems” principle.

She said that at the end of the 45 days, she was told to declare in front of the camera that she had not been tortured and that she would not protest or accept media interviews.

She was also forced to admit in writing that her radicalism was wrong, which she described as “the worst thing in my life.” After that, she was sent to Shaanxi Province in northeast China, and was released on bail pending trial for “provocation and provocation”.

She was not provided with any written documentation of these allegations.

One year after she was released on bail, she was only allowed to return to Shenzhen, the border city where she lived, and was barred from going to Hong Kong.

The missing Hong Kong demonstrator Huang Cuishan
The missing Hong Kong demonstrator Huang Cuishan

These conditions expired at the end of last month.

Ms. Huang told reporters that “unless the political situation changes fundamentally,” she “has no courage” to return to Shenzhen.

She also called for the release of 12 Hong Kong militants believed to be fleeing to Taiwan. They were intercepted by sea on the mainland in August.

In June this year, China arrested a group of militants in Hong Kong under the controversial national security law.

The security law that many people oppose in Hong Kong imposes a maximum sentence on Beijing that refers to subversion, secession, terrorism, and collusion with foreign forces in a broad sense.

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