Two California men were arrested for splashing synthetic compounds on police during the Capitol riots

Helen Dunmore

Two California men were captured and blamed for splashing synthetic compounds on police during the Capitol riots David Nicholas Dempsey and Jeffrey Scott Brown face multiple charges for their involvement in the deadly riots.

David Nicholas Dempsey, 34, of Los Angeles, and Jeffrey Scott Brown, 54 of Santa Ana, were captured and accused of different wrongdoings identified with the lethal attack by a horde who attempted to topple the official political race, therefore, government authorities have said.

Two California men were captured and blamed for splashing synthetic compounds on police during the Capitol riots David Nicholas Dempsey and Jeffrey Scott Brown face multiple charges for their involvement in the deadly riots.
David Nicholas Dempsey and Jeffrey Scott Brown face multiple charges for their involvement in the deadly riots.

Brown was accused of causing bodily harm to a police officer, obstructing law enforcement, committing physical violence in the restricted area, and performing disorderly behavior in the Capitol.

The complaint alleges that he was caught in a YouTube video in front of the gallows built near the Capitol, demanding that the political opponents of former President Donald Trump be hanged.

The authorities said that Dempsey also used other weapons to attack the police on January 6. A Department of Justice spokesperson said Dempsey was still in jail on Friday, and a detention hearing is scheduled for Tuesday.

The Los Angeles County Attorney said

The Los Angeles County Attorney said that as early as October 2019, Dempsey was arrested and accused of using bear spray on a group of protesters at an anti-Trump rally on the Santa Monica Pier.

The prosecutor said on Friday that he had not pleaded a felony of using tear gas and was sentenced to two years in prison in May this year.

When federal authorities arrested him on Thursday at his home near Van Nuys in northwestern Los Angeles, it was unclear whether Dempsey had begun or completed his state sentence.

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A man who picked up the publicly listed phone number for Dempsey claimed to be the brother of the defendant and said he did not know whether the mob accused on January 6 was in Washington, DC.

“I don’t think he has any violent tendencies. He has a golden heart and he is very soft,” the man said before hanging up the phone.

According to the criminal lawsuit against Brown, CCTV footage also showed that Brown handed a can of “spray” from another mob and then “deployed” the spray to the police for “a few seconds.”

The complaint stated that the title of the YouTube video was “A chaotic scene shot in the U.S. Capitol because the crowd challenged the police” showed Brown in a group of thugs who tore off a gas mask from the face of a policeman, “You can see it in your mouth. Blood,” the complaint said.

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